Hummus with Coriander Oil and Roasted Carrot Dippers

On today’s agenda is hummus…. What better way to pimp up your afternoon snack time then with a made over version of the classic hummus and carrot sticks.

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The carrots are oven roasted to sticky, sweet perfection and served with a creamy houmous, topped with coriander oil. All totally filling, nutritious and delicious.

I like to make a big batch of the coriander oil and store it in the fridge to add to dips and dressings. It is a great condiment, which I will make with varying different herbs, according to the ingredientsI have in the fridge at the time. Parsley and Mint are also two regulars.

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So you might wonder why it is worth making hummus. It is certainly a really cheap thing to buy, but homemade is so much nicer. You also get a lot more bang for your buck and can pimp it up with whatever herbs and spices you fancy.

Some pan fried, crispy onion and a few toasted cumin seeds, or smoked paprika and a pinch of chilli… you can find a recipe for my Smokey Hummus the recipe here, make a nice garnish.

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For the Carrots

  • 400g small whole carrots, washed and trimmed
  • 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • a big pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of any dried herbs – thyme, rosemary, cumin seeds

Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees celsius
Place the carrots in a large roasting tin, making sure they aren’t over crowded. Drizzle with olive oil and season. Roast in the oven, turning occasionally, for 35-40 minutes, or until golden.
*Ovens and carrot sizes vary so check them after half an hour.

For the Hummus

It sounds mad, but adding milk to hummus is a genius trick. I was taught this when I went on a cooking course with a top chef in Istanbul. At the time I thought he was mad, but it turned out to be the best hummus id ever had. It makes it so much creamer and smoother. If you want to avoid dairy, feel free to swap the milk to almond or oat milk.

  • 2-3 tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 400g chickpeas
  • 1/2 lemon, juice
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3-4 tbs milk

Put in a blender/ mini-blender or magimix and blitz. Add a little extra lemon or salt, to taste.

For the Coriander Oil

  • 1/2 cup/ 8g coriander
  • 100ml extra virgin olive oil
  • a pinch of salt

Method

Bring a small saucepan of salted water to a boil. Tie the bunch of coriander together with a rubber band, then drop the bunch in the boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove from the boiling water and plunge straight into ice water. Lay out some kitchen paper. Remove the coriander from the ice bath and drain on the paper. Use a processor or little mini blender to puree the leaves, ev* olive oil and a pinch of salt until smooth. At this point you can choose whether you want to strain the coriander pulp away and have a pure oil. This is very pretty for drizzling and garnish, but I tend to get lazy at this point and leave it rustic. If you do attempt it, be sure to wet the cloth before attempting to strain the oil, otherwise you will loose half of it.

Other things I like to use coriander oil for is in sandwiches (which I can’t have at the moment, damn.. ) ummm what else.. In soup on curry, drizzled over poached eggs, with cold meat, in asian-style salad dressings… you get the idea.

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